Login

Dharampal

Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – III – Home Education

The number of Indians who studied before the modern age was much higher than that number in Europe. Even more than that in a survey in Madras Presidency during 1822-55 it was found that the number of those who were instructed at homes was nearly five times the number of those who were instructed in the schools. This article looks into these figures.

Read More

Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – II

Contrary to what people believe in a survey in Madras Presidency during 1822-55 it was found that there were 11,575 schools in the Madras Presidency with 1,57,195 students studying in them; the reports of the collectors of various districts also noted that there were in all 1,094 ‘colleges’ or centres of higher learning with 5,431 students studying in them. An important feature that emerged from the survey data was the wide-spread extent of the indigenous system of education, as evidenced by the number of boys who were undergoing instruction.

Read More

Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree”: Part 1

In this first part of a series of articles, Dr. Probal Roy Chowdhury discusses the state of indigenous education in India before the British destroyed the system. He is quoting various surveys that were done in the colonial times to put the reality in perspective.

Read More

Did Schools Charge Fee in 19th Century?

The English education model made it compulsory for all schools to charge a fixed amount of monthly fees. But how did the old traditional schools sustain themselves before the British arrived in India? Read on to find out.

Read More

Did Brahmins have Monopoly on Education?

One of the most persistent leftist dogmas regarding Indian society is that Brahmin hegemony was ubiquitous and using their so-called 'favorable position', the Brahmins horribly discriminated against every section of the society. This charge is also laid in the field of education. It is claimed that Brahmins created a monopoly in education and did not let anyone else study, thus ensuring their perpetual servility. In this brilliant but brief article, Dr. Ankur Kakkar counters by producing reports of the British officials who conducted surveys on the state of education as it was prevalent in the 19th century.

Read More

Were Indians Uneducated Before the British Arrived?

Because we believe that the British gave us railways, roads, parliamentary democracy and much more, we also tend to believe that the Englishman made us educated and civilised. It is a common belief that before the advent of British colonial rule, most Indians were not very well educated or that education was limited to a few privileged Brahmins. But what do historical records say?

Read More
Centre For Indic studies
X