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Hinduism

A Hindu Call for Religious Pluralism

While pluralism is the by-word of today's liberalism, it is seldom practised by its own proponents. In this brief excerpt, from 'Awaken Bharata' David Frawley talks about how the offer of Hinduism is pluralist in intent and what real pluralism looks like.

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Matter or Consciousness – What Came First?

In this article, Shri Anirvan discusses the theory of material evolution that is prevalent in the modern world and he charts out how the spiritual evolution of man is different from this and one should not fall in the trap of explaining everything with the idea of Evolution.

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Nature of the Divine in Hinduism: One or Many?

This is an excerpt from the book, “Veda Mimansa – Volume 1” by Shri Anirvan. In this brief foray, Shri Anirvan describes how Hindus do not find any internal contradiction between believing in a formless, attribute-less divinity in the form of Supreme Consciousness and on the other hand, worshipping hundreds of deities with proper forms and attributes.

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The Origin and the Use of Image in India – Part 2

In this excerpt from the book “Transformation of Nature in Art” by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy explains the logic behind image worship in Hindu Dharma. he explains the apparent paradox of Hindu Dharma where the Divine is imagined as without any form or attributes on one hand and on the other multiplicity of forms and attributes are also to be seen quite prevalent in the society. Coomaraswamy explains that in reality there is no paradox.

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The Origin and the Use of Image in India – Part 1

In this excerpt from the book “Transformation of Nature in Art” by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, he explores the conception of Art in India. He analyzes icon worship in India and explains how the Hindus conceive divinity and how they worship it. He also analyzes the hypocritical attitudes of Christianity and Islam who blame Hindus of being superstitious.

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Nothing is Everything: How Buddhism and Hinduism are Two Sides of the Same Coin – 3

This is an excerpt from the book "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright. It talks about Buddhism's focus on 'Nothing' and Hinduism's focus on 'Everything'. In Hindu thought, specifically within a Hindu school of thought known as Advaita Vedanta, there is the idea that the individual self or soul is actually just a part of what you might call a universal soul. To put the proposition in Hindu terminology: atman (the self or soul) is Brahman (the universal soul). Now, to say that atman is anything at all – Brahman, whatever – is to say that atman exists in the first place. And the very birth of Buddhism, its distinct emergence within an otherwise Hindu milieu, is thought to lie largely in the denial that atman exists.

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Fundamentals of Monotheism – Dharma vs. Religion – Part 3

In this brief excerpt, one of India's greatest modern historians, Sita Ram Goel discusses the fundamentals of monotheism and how it differs from the fundamentals of polytheism. This excerpt discusses the fundamentals which differentiate Dharma from Religion.

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Signs of the Divine

This is an excerpt from the “Human and Divine: 2000 Years of Indian Sculpture” by Balraj Khanna and George Michell. Balraj Khanna in this short excerpt discusses the symbolism of Indian Art. He explains how the various mudras, postures and ayudhas of the deities convey different aspects and moods of the divine.

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Examination of Advaita Spirituality – Dharma vs. Religion – Part 2

Sita Ram Goel in this brief excerpt discusses the principle of Advaita and the concept of spirituality according to Indic culture. He analyzes seven aspects of Advaita and Indian spirituality and also compares it with the Prophetic Monotheistic mindset.

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The Fifth Veda

This is an excerpt from the book “Veda Mimansa – Volume 1” by Shri Anirvan. The Vedanta in reality is the culmination of the Vedic philosophy. It is the exposition of the meaning of the Veda from the standpoint of ‘Knowledge’ (Vijnana). Therefore, it may be said that in order to discover the meaning of the mantras, we have to have a foundation of comprehensive knowledge of the Upanisad, an intimate acquaintance with the Trantra, the Purana and a direct experience of the methods of the Yogic and Tantrik spiritual praxis.

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