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Education

Revisiting the Beautiful Tree – 6

Building upon the data and the tables that were discussed in the previous article, this article discusses the state of education as it was in Madras Presidency when the British started ruling it.

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Revisiting the Beautiful Tree – 5

This article discusses the data of various schools in the Madras presidency and analyzes what education was in the schools and what it meant for the boys and girls who studied there.

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Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – 4 – Caste Profile of the Students

The greatest of the myths about ancient Indian education system in India is that Brahmins had such a completely monopoly on every kind of education that almost all other jatis and varnas were illiterate. Dharampal in his seminal study of the 19th century education system broke this myth. Dr. Probal Roy Chowdhury in this article discusses the respective number of students that studied from a particular community.

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Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – 3

The number of Indians who studied before the modern age was much higher than that number in Europe. Even more than that in a survey in Madras Presidency during 1822-55 it was found that the number of those who were instructed at homes was nearly five times the number of those who were instructed in the schools. This article looks into these figures.

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Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – 2

Contrary to what people believe in a survey in Madras Presidency during 1822-55 it was found that there were 11,575 schools in the Madras Presidency with 1,57,195 students studying in them; the reports of the collectors of various districts also noted that there were in all 1,094 ‘colleges’ or centres of higher learning with 5,431 students studying in them. An important feature that emerged from the survey data was the wide-spread extent of the indigenous system of education, as evidenced by the number of boys who were undergoing instruction.

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Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – 1

In this article, Probal Roy Chowdhury introduces the idea of The Beautiful Tree which was used as a metaphor for Indian education system by Gandhi and then picked up by Shri Dharampal.

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The Romantic View of Human Relations

The triumph of the romantic view of education was doubly disastrous because it coincided with the triumph of the romantic view of human relations, especially family relations. This view goes something like this: the object of human life being happiness, and the fact that many marriages are unhappy being patent and obvious; it is time to found human relationships not upon such extraneous and unromantic bases as social obligation, financial interest, and duty, but upon nothing other than love, affection and inclination. All attempts at stability founded upon anything but love, affection and inclination are inherently oppressive and therefore ought to be discounted. Once relations — especially those between the sexes — were founded upon love alone, the full beauty of the human personality, hitherto obscured by clouds of duty, convention, social shame and the like, would emerge, as a shimmering dragonfly in the summer. This is an excerpt from ‘Spoilt Rotten – The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality’.

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Introducing Dharampal

In this article, Dr. Probal Roy Chowdhury introduces the major works of Dharampal and discusses what he contributed to Indian historiography. He was one of the pioneers of modern Indian history, particularly the history of Indian education and educational institutions.

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The Sentimental View of Education

In this excerpt, Dalrymple analyzes how the sentimental view of education has ruined the entire system. He quotes Steven Pinker and his influence over British education in the past few years. He tells us how even right ideas can wreak havoc if implemented in wrong domains and with wrong intent. What he gives us is a view of sentimental moralising. This is an excerpt from the book ‘Spoilt Rotten! – The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality’.

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The Romantic Idea of Education

In this article, Theodore Dalrymple the cultural critic discusses how the romantic ideas penetrated or rather invaded educational institutions in the late 19th and early 20th century and how they destroyed the traditional education system which was effective than its substitution. This is an excerpt from ‘Spoilt Rotten – The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality’.

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