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The Romantic View of Human Relations

The triumph of the romantic view of education was doubly disastrous because it coincided with the triumph of the romantic view of human relations, especially family relations. This view goes something like this: the object of human life being happiness, and the fact that many marriages are unhappy being patent and obvious; it is time to found human relationships not upon such extraneous and unromantic bases as social obligation, financial interest, and duty, but upon nothing other than love, affection and inclination. All attempts at stability founded upon anything but love, affection and inclination are inherently oppressive and therefore ought to be discounted. Once relations — especially those between the sexes — were founded upon love alone, the full beauty of the human personality, hitherto obscured by clouds of duty, convention, social shame and the like, would emerge, as a shimmering dragonfly in the summer. This is an excerpt from ‘Spoilt Rotten – The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality’.

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Introducing Dharampal

In this article, Dr. Probal Roy Chowdhury introduces the major works of Dharampal and discusses what he contributed to Indian historiography. He was one of the pioneers of modern Indian history, particularly the history of Indian education and educational institutions.

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The Sentimental View of Education

In this excerpt, Dalrymple analyzes how the sentimental view of education has ruined the entire system. He quotes Steven Pinker and his influence over British education in the past few years. He tells us how even right ideas can wreak havoc if implemented in wrong domains and with wrong intent. What he gives us is a view of sentimental moralising. This is an excerpt from the book ‘Spoilt Rotten! – The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality’.

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The Romantic Idea of Education

In this article, Theodore Dalrymple the cultural critic discusses how the romantic ideas penetrated or rather invaded educational institutions in the late 19th and early 20th century and how they destroyed the traditional education system which was effective than its substitution. This is an excerpt from ‘Spoilt Rotten – The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality’.

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The Book I Would Pass To My Children

The Book I would pass to my children would contain no sermons, no shoulds and oughts. Genuine love comes from knowledge, not from a sense of duty or guilt. How would you like to be an invalid mother with a daughter who can't marry because she feels she ought to look after you, and therefore hates you? My wish would be to tell, not how things ought to be, but how they are, and how and why we ignore them as they are. You cannot teach an ego to be anything but egotistic, even though egos have the subtlest ways of pretending to be reformed. The basic thing is therefore to dispel, by experiment and experience, the illusion of oneself as a separate ego. The consequences may not be behavior along the lines of conventional morality.

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Gandhi on Indigenous Education

At India’s independence, the level of literacy in India was very low. Notwithstanding the arguments which consider oral education to be as good as literate culture for the moment, there has to be some reason for this poor state of education in India. India is one of the oldest civilizations in the world with one of the first literate cultures. How did things come to this? In this article, Dr. Probal Ray Chowdhury tells us what Gandhi thought about indigenous education system of India.

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Trying to Live a Zero-Waste Life

In this beautiful personal story of living sustainably, this homeschooling family stopped using various industrial products because they did not want to produce any waste which they couldn’t get rid of by burning. In this quest they created a beautiful, if sometimes hard life for themselves. They created a life which was not only sustainable but may become the only viable life after the crisis of COVID19 is over.

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Our New Education Policy: Progressive or Regressive?

What is common between Leonardo Da Vinci, Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs? To start with, they were creative geniuses and they loved science, music, and art. But the deeper connection between these luminaries is that their creativity was a product of the interaction between science and art. In fact, they did not see a conflict between their scientific and artistic tempers. This would seem surprising to many of us who have long believed in the dichotomy of science versus arts, logic versus creativity, or, left brain versus right brain. Now, the theory that people are either left-brained or right-brained is no longer accepted, even in scientific circles. Yet, it is precisely this idea that has shaped our education policy for over a century. The new education policy is a refreshing change in this respect. Read on to know why.

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Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – IV – Caste Profiles of the Students

The greatest of the myths about ancient Indian education system in India is that Brahmins had such a completely monopoly on every kind of education that almost all other jatis and varnas were illiterate. Dharampal in his seminal study of the 19th century education system broke this myth. Dr. Probal Roy Chowdhury in this article discusses the respective number of students that studied from a particular community.

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Revisiting “The Beautiful Tree” – II

Contrary to what people believe in a survey in Madras Presidency during 1822-55 it was found that there were 11,575 schools in the Madras Presidency with 1,57,195 students studying in them; the reports of the collectors of various districts also noted that there were in all 1,094 ‘colleges’ or centres of higher learning with 5,431 students studying in them. An important feature that emerged from the survey data was the wide-spread extent of the indigenous system of education, as evidenced by the number of boys who were undergoing instruction.

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