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Dharma

Buddhi is not Intellect alone : An Indic Perspective

May 7,20by Shri Anirvan

On this Buddha Purnmia, in this enlightening piece, Shri Anirvan explains to us, what the real meaning of Buddhi is in Indian tradition. It has been universally admitted that buddhi, whether as a spiritual stage or an instrumentation, is something above the mental plane; It has both a psychological and a cosmic aspect, the relation between the two in spiritual realization being that between a means and an end; and its intrinsic character is in the nature of an illumination granted by divine grace. This is an excerpt of "Buddhiyoga of the Gita", Prabudha Bharat, 1948.

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How Dharma can Help Survive us in a Fragile World?

Times of crises are when one's svadharma is tested. In these times, we get to know how strong the cultural foundations of our society are, how strong we ourselves are, standing upon those foundations. In this article, author Rabinarayan Swain has attempted to explain in simple terms how to have a grip on our mental and physical health in these hard times.

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The Vedic Yajña: A Conduit for Transcending the Conditioned Consciousness

Feb 18,20by Sreejit Datta

Evolutionist and anthropological frameworks of interpretation have belittled the Vedic mantra as well as the Vedic Yajña by categorizing the two as naïve and obscure religious expressions (e.g. through labels like hymns and rituals, respectively) of the early humans. This article highlights the consciousness-altering potential of the Vedic Yajña and the role of the Vedic mantra in it by positing that the Vedic Yajña is neither just a ritual nor merely a metaphor; rather it is a powerful performative element in its own right, which pervades the ‘conditioned consciousness’ of its performer and uplifts the same to ever higher planes of consciousness, thus revealing to the performer/practitioner subtler layers of reality on the way to the Truth.

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Religious Pluralism and Freedom of Religious and Spiritual Experience

Freedom in the West, is often interpreted as the freedom of action of individual in this world. But David Frawley, in this brilliant excerpt of 'Awaken Bharata' explains how freedom has many modes and internal freedom is the freedom which Hindu Dharma has always focused upon.

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A Hindu Call for Religious Pluralism

While pluralism is the by-word of today's liberalism, it is seldom practised by its own proponents. In this brief excerpt, from 'Awaken Bharata' David Frawley talks about how the offer of Hinduism is pluralist in intent and what real pluralism looks like.

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Matter or Consciousness – What Came First?

In this article, Shri Anirvan discusses the theory of material evolution that is prevalent in the modern world and he charts out how the spiritual evolution of man is different from this and one should not fall in the trap of explaining everything with the idea of Evolution.

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Nature of the Divine in Hinduism: One or Many?

This is an excerpt from the book, “Veda Mimansa – Volume 1” by Shri Anirvan. In this brief foray, Shri Anirvan describes how Hindus do not find any internal contradiction between believing in a formless, attribute-less divinity in the form of Supreme Consciousness and on the other hand, worshipping hundreds of deities with proper forms and attributes.

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The Origin and the Use of Image in India – Part 1

In this excerpt from the book “Transformation of Nature in Art” by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, he explores the conception of Art in India. He analyzes icon worship in India and explains how the Hindus conceive divinity and how they worship it. He also analyzes the hypocritical attitudes of Christianity and Islam who blame Hindus of being superstitious.

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Examination of Monotheism – Dharma vs. Religion – 4

In this brief excerpt Sita Ram Goel explains about the differences between the Tradition of Advaita and the Tradition of Monotheism. Differences arise when different individuals espouse the opposite traditions of Advaita and Monotheism intellectually and cherish them consciously. Then the tradition of Monotheism gives birth to Aurangzeb, and the tradition of Advaita to Shivaji.

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Nothing is Everything: How Buddhism and Hinduism are Two Sides of the Same Coin – 3

This is an excerpt from the book "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright. It talks about Buddhism's focus on 'Nothing' and Hinduism's focus on 'Everything'. In Hindu thought, specifically within a Hindu school of thought known as Advaita Vedanta, there is the idea that the individual self or soul is actually just a part of what you might call a universal soul. To put the proposition in Hindu terminology: atman (the self or soul) is Brahman (the universal soul). Now, to say that atman is anything at all – Brahman, whatever – is to say that atman exists in the first place. And the very birth of Buddhism, its distinct emergence within an otherwise Hindu milieu, is thought to lie largely in the denial that atman exists.

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Centre For Indic studies
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