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Dharma

Nature of the Divine in Hinduism: One or Many?

This is an excerpt from the book, “Veda Mimansa – Volume 1” by Shri Anirvan. In this brief foray, Shri Anirvan describes how Hindus do not find any internal contradiction between believing in a formless, attribute-less divinity in the form of Supreme Consciousness and on the other hand, worshipping hundreds of deities with proper forms and attributes.

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The Origin and the Use of Image in India – Part 1

In this excerpt from the book “Transformation of Nature in Art” by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, he explores the conception of Art in India. He analyzes icon worship in India and explains how the Hindus conceive divinity and how they worship it. He also analyzes the hypocritical attitudes of Christianity and Islam who blame Hindus of being superstitious.

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Examination of Monotheism – Dharma vs. Religion – 4

In this brief excerpt Sita Ram Goel explains about the differences between the Tradition of Advaita and the Tradition of Monotheism. Differences arise when different individuals espouse the opposite traditions of Advaita and Monotheism intellectually and cherish them consciously. Then the tradition of Monotheism gives birth to Aurangzeb, and the tradition of Advaita to Shivaji.

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Nothing is Everything: How Buddhism and Hinduism are Two Sides of the Same Coin – 3

This is an excerpt from the book "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright. It talks about Buddhism's focus on 'Nothing' and Hinduism's focus on 'Everything'. In Hindu thought, specifically within a Hindu school of thought known as Advaita Vedanta, there is the idea that the individual self or soul is actually just a part of what you might call a universal soul. To put the proposition in Hindu terminology: atman (the self or soul) is Brahman (the universal soul). Now, to say that atman is anything at all – Brahman, whatever – is to say that atman exists in the first place. And the very birth of Buddhism, its distinct emergence within an otherwise Hindu milieu, is thought to lie largely in the denial that atman exists.

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Nothing is Everything: How Buddhism and Hinduism are Two Sides of the Same Coin – 2

In this brilliant excerpt from the famous book “Why Buddhism is True”, author Robert Wright explains through the aid of evolutionary biology and parasitology how the illusion of the clear boundary between the individual Self and the outside world breaks down. He then also discusses the implications and the meanings of ‘I’ and ‘Rest’ in such light, leading on to the differences in social thinking of Buddhism and Hinduism.

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The System of Vedanta

This is an excerpt from the first book, “Our Oriental Heritage” of the world famous history of Will Durant, called “The Story of Civilization” It explains the philosophy of Vedanta and its impact on the Hindu mind over the ages.

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Nothing is Everything: How Buddhism and Hinduism are Two Sides of the Same Coin – 1

This is an excerpt of the famous work “Why Buddhism is True” by Robert Wright. He analyzes the basic beliefs of Buddhism in idiom that is accessible to everyone and concludes that the basic premise of Buddhism and other eastern philosophies is that “Everything is One”.

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Fundamentals of Monotheism – Dharma vs. Religion – Part 3

In this brief excerpt, one of India's greatest modern historians, Sita Ram Goel discusses the fundamentals of monotheism and how it differs from the fundamentals of polytheism. This excerpt discusses the fundamentals which differentiate Dharma from Religion.

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Dharma vs. Religion – Part I

In European languages, there was no one word which could completely express the essential nature of dharma. So the European scholars had to make use of different words relative to the context in which the word had been used in Indian literature. In the English language, dharma was translated as religion, righteousness, law, tradition, moral code, etc., according to the context. But the modern scholars in India did not have to experience any such difficulty in the context of translation. They heard the word 'religion' of the English language and decided instantly and unanimously that this word should be translated as 'dharma' in all Indian languages.

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Centre For Indic studies
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