Login

Art

The Living and the Historical Temple

Which is better? The living or the historical temple? The living institution or the historical structure? In this article, Pankaj Saxena discusses the possible attitudes that we can take about maintaining our heritage. It is both a reservoir of our history and also a living institution. How to treat the Hindu Temple will also be telling about how the Hindus are going to treat their heritage and culture in general.

Read More

7 Ganeshas from 7 Temples Across India

In this article, Pankaj Saxena discusses seven most exquisite vigrahas of Ganesha, all across the country, through six states and seven temples. The article also discusses the history of these temples and places.

Read More

Indian Art and the Concept of Pramana

In this excerpt, Ananda Coomarasway explains the concept of Indian art in context of the theory of Pramana. He tells us how drama used to emphasize that he actors cannot get ‘fooled’ by the drama itself. And with this context, he brings in the theory of the different kinds of Pramana and how they are applicable in Indian art.

Read More

Shall Art Imitate Nature? – The Concept of Sadrsya

In this piece, Ananda Coomaraswamy discusses what is the purpose of Art as commanded by Indian canons as well as other eastern cultures and civilizations as opposed to the purpose of art in the West. He also gives us the concept of Sadrsya in Indian Art, on what is considered to be the true nature of beings.

Read More

The Art Within

In this article, Ananda Coomaraswamy explains how the inspiration of all art in India is spiritual and comes from within. It is not just an act of observation but an act of absorption of the divine form, which is revealed to the artist when he meditates upon the nature of the truth. All Art in India is thus ideally derived. It is taken from Coomaraswamy’s definitive work on Art, “The Transformation of Nature in Art”.

Read More

The Origin and the Use of Image in India – Part 3

In this concluding part of this series, Coomaraswamy explains how the purpose of art in India was never just to imitate Nature, but also to transcend it and that is why Indian art is famously ‘not realistic’. This article is an excerpt from the book “The Transformation of Nature in Art” by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy.

Read More

The Origin and the Use of Image in India – Part 2

In this excerpt from the book “Transformation of Nature in Art” by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy explains the logic behind image worship in Hindu Dharma. he explains the apparent paradox of Hindu Dharma where the Divine is imagined as without any form or attributes on one hand and on the other multiplicity of forms and attributes are also to be seen quite prevalent in the society. Coomaraswamy explains that in reality there is no paradox.

Read More

The Origin and the Use of Image in India – Part 1

In this excerpt from the book “Transformation of Nature in Art” by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, he explores the conception of Art in India. He analyzes icon worship in India and explains how the Hindus conceive divinity and how they worship it. He also analyzes the hypocritical attitudes of Christianity and Islam who blame Hindus of being superstitious.

Read More

Sensuality and Spirituality

Jan 22,20by Balraj Khanna

This is an excerpt from Balraj Khanna’s book “Human and Divine”. Depiction of sensuous pleasure has never been suppressed in Hinduism, because the human body is not seen as separate from the spirit. Even with Jainism, whose followers adhere to the world’s strictest regime of vegetarianism, bordering on extremism, we see its godly Tirthankara’s (divine preceptors) as well-proportioned, robust beings despite their austere diet, although stern, they have a sense of well-bring and exude a spiritual calm.

Read More

The Sacredness in Crafts

Jan 2,20by Balraj Khanna

This is an excerpt from the “Human and Divine: 2000 Years of Indian Sculpture” by Balraj Khanna and George Michell. Balraj Khanna in this short excerpt discusses the lifestyle and behavior of a craftsmen, as envisioned and followed by the greatest of artists and craftsmen in India.

Read More
Centre For Indic studies
X