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All posts by Ram Swarup

Decoding Vedic Symbolism

Every word, truth and experience is self-transcending. In everything that is spoken, there is the unspoken; in everything known, there is the unknown. The soul offers worship and homage to this transcendental, this unspoken, this unknown.

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Indian Influences in developing Aldous Huxley’s Thought: Part IV

Hinduism, he said tried to represent the superhuman and the metaphysical and, as a result, "Hindus have evolved a system of art full of metaphysical monsters and grotesques". Carrying on the discussion, he concluded that the "Hindus are too much interested in metaphysics and ultimate reality to make good artists. Art is not the discovery of Reality - whatever reality may be... It is the organization of chaotic appearance into an orderly and human universe".

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Indian Influences in developing Aldous Huxley’s Thought: Part III

Salvation is man's assussured possession, not a chance windfall. God is not a pie in the sky who appeared from nowhere at a particular time and became operative in human affairs; he has been active from the beginning. The great spiritual life resides in the heart and its truths are open to all sincere seekers. Man has known, possessed and lived those truths long before "revealed religions" were heard of.

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Indian Influences in developing Aldous Huxley’s Thought: Part II

In Hinduism, dying is an art. In the higher reaches of Yoga, one can choose at will when to quit and where to go. Under certain circumstances, voluntary death - prâyopaveSaNa, sallekhana or santhârâ - is admitted. The art of dying however is the same as the art of living. Noble life and noble death go together.

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Indian Influences in developing Aldous Huxley’s Thought: Part I

Aldous Huxley is one of those who enriched the West greatly with the wisdom of the East. Though he came late on the scene, his influence was nonetheless real and deep. Himself a great intellectual, he spoke to the intellect of the West its most effective medium of communication.

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From Sikhs into Singhs

Apr 3,21by Ram Swarup

There were two fronts and two movements working simultaneously. They were closely interlinked. One was to separate the Sikhs from the Hindus. The other was the conversion of the Sikhs themselves into a single category of the Keshdhari Sikhs

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The Hindu Sikh Cleavage: Story of British Machination

To fulfil a certain need of the hour, Guru Govind Singh preached the gospel of the Khalsa, the pure of the elect. Those who joined his group passed though a ceremony known as Pahul, and to emphasize the martial nature of their new vocation, they were given the title of Singh or “Lion”. Thus began a sect which was not based on birth but which drew its recruits from those who were not Khalsa by birth. It was almost wholly manned by the Hindus.

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Hindu Roots of Sikhism-3

Feb 13,21by Ram Swarup

How did Sikhism come to be seen as a separate religion? Was it due to the political interests of the British rulers in India? Read on to know.

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Hindu Roots of Sikhism – 2

Feb 3,21by Ram Swarup

Did Sikh Gurus repudiate Hindu scriptures? Was Sikhism fashioned out of a conflict with the Hindu pantheon? In this article, Ram Swarup Ji answers these doubts and shatters many myths.

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Hindu Roots of Sikhism – 1

Did the Sikh gurus fashion a new religion as is often claimed? In this excerpt from Ram Swarup's work, we learn that Sikh teachings were rooted in Hindu scriptures.

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